MICHAEL FITZSIMMONS DECORATIVE ARTS
Over 30 years specializing in the Arts & Crafts field
English Arts & Crafts Textiles
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Morris & Company, c.1876-1900
Honeysuckle printed linen
Pristine, unused condition  44 1/2"h x 36 1/2"w
$1500

Originally designed by William Morris and registered October 11, 1876, Honeysuckle was a print inspired by the vines which grew at Kelmscott Manor, Morris' summer home. This pattern was originally offered in linen, cotton, silk and velveteen. The original printing blocks of 36" in width were used on this sample.  

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Morris & Company, c.1896-1900
Compton printed cotton
Pristine, unused condition 70 1/4"h x 30 1/2"w
$2400

Originally designed by John Dearle, textile designer for Morris & Co. and registered February 27, 1896, Compton was a print commisioned for Compton Hall, Wolverhampton. This pattern was only offered in cotton, but was also offered as a wallpaper. The original printing blocks of 27" in width were used on this sample which also shows the original pattern repeat of 53 1/4".  

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Morris & Company, c.1884-1917
Cray printed cotton
Used condition, some soiling  19"h x 38"w
$1100

Originally designed by William Morris in 1884, Cray was the most expensive fabric Morris & Company produced requiring 34 blocks. This pattern was originally offered in linen and cotton and despite the price, became one of the firm's most popular patterns and was offered in many colorways. The original printing blocks of 36" in width were used on this sample. The selvage reads, "Reg. Morris & Company 449 Oxford Street London W" and 60 BG. The location of the Morris & Company showroom at 449 Oxford Street places the date of this sample between 1884 and 1917, since the firm moved to a larger location in 1917.  

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Morris & Company, c.1885-1900
Medway printed cotton
Pristine, unused condition 15 1/2"h x 18"w
$1200

Originally designed by William Morris and registered September 21, 1885. This pattern was originally offered in linen and cotton and also as a wallpaper named "Garden Tulip." Medway was a pattern originally printed by the indigo discharge method, which firsts dyes the fabric blue, then prints the areas not intended to be blue with a bleaching agent. Morris himself spent nearly a year perfecting this method, his hands and forearms permanently dyed blue all the while.  

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